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Tim Cook spotted testing Apple's glucose monitor

Tim Cook spotted testing Apple's glucose monitor

The report claims that the team is "part of a super secret initiative, initially envisioned by the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop sensors that can non invasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes".

Apple CEO Tim Cook has been wearing a prototype glucose tracker that pairs with the Apple Watch, according to a report from CNBC.

However, the Apple Watch seems like the most likely candidate at this stage. And, since this sensing device is being paired with the Apple Watch, you'll have access to your reading and other necessary data right on your wrist. Indeed, the iPhone maker is already conducting feasibility trials for a glucose monitoring device in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to CNBC sources.

In April, CNBC reported that Apple had hired a team of biomedical engineers to work at a separate office in Palo Alto, Calif.

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Consequently, the Cupertino Company is all set to release some smart bands that could connect to the Apple Watch to monitor blood sugar levels in real time and thereby help its wearer to experience diabetes treatment in a non-invasive style.

If such sensors are successfully developed, that would be a breakthrough as it is highly challenging to track glucose levels accurately without piercing the skin.

The indication that a new Apple product is on the way comes after Cook told University of Glasgow students in February that he had recently been wearing a continuous glucose tracker. "There is lots of hope out there that if someone has constant knowledge of what they're eating, they can instantly know what causes the response. and that they can adjust well before they become diabetic".