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Turkey's Erdogan to discuss Qatar dispute with Trump, minister says

Turkey's Erdogan to discuss Qatar dispute with Trump, minister says

Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates announced hotlines to help families with Qatari members, their official news agencies reported, after their cutting of diplomatic and transport ties with Qatar led to travel disruption.

He said that Qatar's promotion of its political crisis as a siege of the Gulf state is the country's way of turning the case into a human rights issue, noting that Qatar's interpretation of a siege "is not consistent with open ports and an airport with a large fleet of aircraft".

"Taking action to isolate a country in all areas is inhumane and un-Islamic", Erdogan said in televised comments to his party in Ankara.

Qatar denied allegations over its support to terrorism and extremism adding that the diplomatic rift was based on "baseless fabricated claims".

Kuwait has tried to mediate in the crisis between Qatar and other Arab nations over Doha's alleged support of Islamists and its ties to Iran.

Erdogan also defended Qatar by saying that Doha has taken decisive stand against the Islamic State.

Bihar Board Class 10 results to be declared soon on biharboard
This will come as welcome news for lakhs of students who appeared for the exams earlier in the month of March. Last year, the result was out on May 29 and it saw a sharp 26-per cent decline in pass percentage.

The three countries' aviation authorities also said that non-Qatari private and chartered flights from Qatar must submit requests to them at least 24 hours before crossing the airspace. Turkey and Qatar have both provided support for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and backed rebels fighting to overthrow Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. It is the worst crisis for the GCC since its creation in 1981.

Vladimir Putin met Saudi Arabia's King Salman on Tuesday, following a meeting with Qatar's Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdelrahman Al Thani over the weekend.

FILE - In this Monday, June 5, 2017 file photo, provided by Doha News, shoppers stock up on supplies at a supermarket in Doha, Qatar after Saudi Arabia closed its land border with Qatar, through which the tiny Gulf nation imports most of its food.

So far, the measures against Qatar do not seem to have caused serious shortages of supplies in shops.

But an economic downturn could have more dire consequences for the vast majority of Qatar's 2.7 million residents, who are not citizens but foreign workers. Most likely, Qatar will make some concessions to return to the fold.