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Tainted egg products recalled from United Kingdom supermarkets

Tainted egg products recalled from United Kingdom supermarkets

The recall of 13 SKUs in the United Kingdom was revealed when the country's Food Standards Agency issued an update on the number of eggs that arrived in the United Kingdom from Dutch farms affected by the contamination.

Egg-containing products including salads, quiches and sandwiches have been recalled from Sainsbury's, Waitrose, Asda and Morrison's.

The U.K.'s food agency on Thursday admitted that more tainted eggs linked to a European food scare have been imported than previously estimated.

"The Dutch investigation focused on the Dutch company that allegedly used fipronil, a Belgian supplier as well as a Dutch company that colluded with the Belgian supplier", the prosecutors said.

Britain's Food Standards Agency said a risk to public health, at this point, is unlikely.

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The U.K. raised its estimate of eggs contaminated by the unauthorized pesticide fipronil, with the outbreak believed to have affected some products made by major supermarkets.

Several Irish food businesses have been forced to remove products from their shelves after it emerged that Dutch eggs and egg products implicated in a contamination scare have been distributed in Ireland. A criminal investigation is under way in Belgium and the Netherlands, centering on two firms - Poultry Vision, a pest control firm from Belgium, which is alleged to have sold the treatment to a Dutch poultry farm cleaning company, Chickfriend. Fipronil can be hazardous to humans' kidneys, liver and thyroid glands, according to the World Health Organization, but only if consumed in large quantities.

Fipronil is commonly used to get rid of fleas, lice and ticks from animals but is banned by the European Union from use in the food industry. Based on the available evidence there is no need for people to change the way they consume or cook eggs.

European Commission spokeswoman Anna-Kaisa Itkonen said that Netherlands, Belgium and Germany warned other countries about the possibility of having exported contaminated eggs to them. "Consumers clearly want retailers and food manufacturers to use good quality British ingredients that are produced to high standards of food safety, but in some prepared foods this is not the case".